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PawaFilmForumXIV : ‘Unfinished Business’ Screening and Discussion

The Pawa254 Film Forum is committed to showcasing independently produced, often non- commercial work that has little opportunity of reaching the general public; highlighting social, political, cultural and historical realities. By featuring the voices and visions of truly independent media artists from Kenya and beyond, we aim to expose diverse audiences to a range of artistic expressions, cultural perspectives and critical inquiries.

For this edition of #PawaFilmForum, we invite InformAction , who will showcase their documentary ‘Unfinished Business’.

PawaFilmForum - Unfinished Buisness-01

Synposis:​
“Unfinished Business” deals with issues on ethnicity and accountability in Kenya’s Central Province. Using film, InformAction captures the views of those living in poverty in the homeland of three of Kenya’s four presidents, as they discuss leadership in the country.For more information about the documentary, please see ifa.or.ke
 
​The screening will be followed by a Q&A. 

Pawa Preview: This Week at Pawa

The Art Rising never stops and every week at PAWA254 we bring amazing events to keep Art alive and effect social change through Artivism. Here’s what we’ve got lined up this week.

  • #OffTheRecord Tuesday 5.30-8pm

Every Tuesday at our Mageuzi space we turn our attention to various social evils and how they affect us. Lend your voice to the progressive debate every week, strictly off the record.

  • #IMED2014 Friday 9am-4pm

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The International Media Ethics Day (IMED) 2014 is a day to celebrate media freedom, and also serve as a reminder on the responsibility of journalists in their reporting. This years event will be held at PAWA254 and hosted by the Association of Freelance Journalists (AFJ)  in partnersh  with PAWA 254 and  Center of International Media Ethics. For more details on this event, registration and the program view the events blog post HERE.

  • #FatumasVoice Saturday 5.30-8pm

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FatumasVoice is a weekly event providing social commentary through poetry and spoken word. It is a collaborative effort between PAWA254 and Kenya Poets Lounge. Connect with #FatumasVoice on Facebook and Twitter @FatumasVoice and on the website http://www.fatumasvoice.org/

 

 

Open show Nairobi #8 on 3rd October.

Open Show Nairobi is back at it again!

The eighth Open Show Nairobi will be held on Friday October 3rd @ 7pm (come at 6:00pm to mingle) at PAWA254!

Join us once again for an evening of incredible visual storytelling!

Open Show is a FREE social screenings where the public can see compelling work and interact directly with photographers, filmmakers and multimedia producers in high-profile spaces.

5 curated presenters (from students to professionals) have 10 minutes each to show a 20 image or 3-8 minute video project with audience questions and feedback.

You can submit your work here NOW: openshow.org/submissions/

Please submit no later than September 25th

This OpenShow event is kindly supported by FilmAid International and PAWA254.

If you are interested in volunteering your time or resources, please email us at nairobi@openshow.org. Remember, Open Show cannot be a success without YOU.

Looking forward to seeing you soon!

For more info: openshow.org/nairobi
Follow us on Twitter: @openshownairobi

Ubuni Film Workshop: Become a Film Director

Ubuni Directing Workshop - Part 2 Promo Poster

When: Saturday 13th September 2014 (10am-1pm)

A series of film workshops that kick started in the month of May is now marking its 5th edition. The Ubuni Workshops started with Writing & Developing a story and is now looking at Directing Part 2 as part of the journey towards producing a TV series.

Following the Directing Workshop (Part 1), Directing Part 2 Workshop will be led by one of Kenya’s most prolific filmmakers CAJETAN BOY. It will mainly tackle:

  • How camera shots are used.
  • Ensuring continuity.
  • The editing suite.

It will have a cast, crew & equipment for this purpose. Directing Part 2 Workshop is part of the process towards the production of a TV series.

Ubuni School of Media & Creative Arts is still accepting new entrants who are interested in being part of this process and has reserved some extra spots for those interested. To book, kindly send an email to ubunischool@gmail.com.

Charges
KSh 800 for Kenya Writers Guild members
KSh 1000 for non-members

Connect with Ubuni School of Media and Creative Arts on Facebook and Twitter @ubunifilmschool

Sauti Ya Mitaa Album Launch

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Sauti Ya Mitaa album launch

Over 20 artists from all over Nairobi representing neo soul, reggae, afro-fusion, hip-hop and spoken word and 20 youths in a choreographed dance show, invites you to an evening full of music, dance and extra ordinary talents.

Sauti ya Mitaa is a unique project, bringing 21 musicians of different genre of music, representing various suburbs and social classes together. It brings out their unique talents and at the same time create awareness about issues affecting them and the society. The Sauti Ya Mitaa album, including 4 beats, 4 genres of music, spoken word and 21 artists, backed by Iklektik band, will be launched on the 12th of September at Pawa254. 

Masonko wa Dandora is a choreographed dance show that aims entertain the audience as well as uplift the self-esteem of the youths in Dandora and other similar slums. The dance show shows the struggles and the strengths of the youths in marginalized communities. The group will launch their latest dance show at the event on the 12th of September.

Paza Sauti Workshop. Arts development and community empowerment, a workshop for local artists and activists. The workshop will take place the day before the launch of Sauti ya Mitaa and Masonko wa Dandora launch.

 

Sauti Ya Mitaa album launchSeptember 12th, 5 pm – 9 pmPawa254Entrance: Advance tickets KHS 300, at entrance KHS 500 Paza Sauti workshopSeptember 11th, 2 pm – 5 pmPawa254Entrance: Free 

 

For more information, please contact Mc Kah on 0721684825 or sautiyamitaa@gmail.com 

For advance tickets, please call 0721845855

 

 

Sauti ya Mitaa is a platform for artist to be seen and heard, while setting professional standard in their field. The project was founded by Maono Cultural Group, a community based organization working since 1999 with arts, sports, environment and exchange programs, targeting young people in Dandora. Maono Cultural Group and Sauti Ya Mitaa are founded by Mc Kah.

 

 

 

PAWA PREVIEW: This Week at Pawa

There’s never a dull moment at PAWA254. Check out this weeks plots!

  • #OffTheRecord Tuesday 9th 5.30-8.pm

Join the discussion this and every Tuesday in our Mageuzi space. Off The Record debate and discussion is a platform for people to freely express social issues affecting them and their possible solutions. Lend your voice to change, STRICTLY OFF THE RECORD.

 

  • Sauti Ya Mitaa Workshop and Launch. Thursday 2-6pm & Friday 5-9pm 

Are you a fan of reggae, urban pop, hip-hop, afrofusion and spoken world? 

Sauti Ya Mitaa album launch

Over 20 artists from all over Nairobi representing neo soul, reggae, afro-fusion, hip-hop and spoken word and 20 youths in a choreographed dance show.

Sauti ya Mitaa is a unique project, bringing 21 musicians of different genre of music, representing various suburbs and social classes together. It brings out their unique talents and at the same time create awareness about issues affecting them and the society. The Sauti Ya Mitaa album, including 4 beats, 4 genres of music, spoken word and 21 artists, backed by Iklektik band, will be launched on the 12th of September at Pawa254.

Masonko wa Dandora is a choreographed dance show that aims entertain the audience as well as uplift the self-esteem of the youths in Dandora and other similar slums. The dance show shows the struggles andthe strengths of the youths in marginalized communities. The group will launch their latest dance show at the event on the 12th of September.

Paza Sauti Workshop. Arts development and community empowerment,a workshop for local artists and activists. The workshop will take place the day before the launch of Sauti ya Mitaa and Masonko wa Dandora launch.

For more details:
Twitter: @sautiyamitaa
Facebook: Sauti Ya Mitaa
Email: sautiyamitaa@gmail.com

Paza Sauti Workshop,Thursday 11th 2 pm ~ 5 pm
Entrance FREE

Sauti Ya Mitaa Album launch, Friday 12th 5 pm ~ 9 pm
Entrance: Advance tickets 300, at the gate 500
For advance tickets, please call 0721845855

Sauti ya Mitaa is a platform for artist to be seen and heard, while setting professional standard in their field. The project was founded by Maono Cultural Group, a community based organization working since 1999 with arts, sports, environment and exchange programs, targeting young people in Dandora. Maono Cultural Group and Sauti Ya Mitaa are founded by Mc Ka.

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Wakilisha your Mtaa this week! See the event page on Facebook.

 

Campus Women Day University of Nairobi

On behalf of University of Nairobi students fraternity, we seek to kindly inform you of the CAMPUS WOMEN DAY that will be held in main campus Taifa hall on 12th september 2014 begging from 9am to 5pm.
 
Its a special day as we highlight #darkdaysofcampuswomen in reaction to the rising rampant cases of sexual harrasments and physical assaults directed to our sisters in various campuses.
 
Our main aim is academic excellence but we  can never attain success in AN INSECURE environment.
 
 #darkdaysofcampuswomen
Campus Women Day Poster-01 (1)

SifaSafi Initiative: Wakulima Market Clean-up 28th Sept

Help us make A change.

Sunday 28 september 2014 at Wakulima Market

About Sifasafi

Sifasafi is an Initiative dedicated to cleaning one city market every Last Sunday* of each Month. We held our first cleanup at Wakulima market on the 9th March 2014.

We are looking for you guys. Want to engage in CSR?

Want to engage with us in Corporate social responsibility for the purpose of promoting sustainable business environments by engaging your employees in our SIFASAFI Cleanups. 

Requirements:

List of 5-20 employees who will attend on behalf of the company

  1. Logos
  2. Contacts for the employees
  3. Weblinks and social media links
Benefits:
currently we are working with the Nairobi City County to give signed certificates to the volunteers. but here are other benefits of carrying out CSR activities with Us:
  • We provide cleaning tools for Free
  • Dust masks and Gloves
  • Snacks and 
  • Chance to network

 

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International Media Ethics Day 2014

The International Media Ethics Day (IMED) 2014 is a day to celebrate media freedom, and also serve as a reminder on the responsibility of journalists in their reporting.

IMED was established in 2011 as a day to mobilize media professionals, IT experts, bloggers, students and interested citizens to discuss ethical dilemmas locally.

Participants will examine case studies, and take part in role-plays and debates related to the various ethical dilemmas they might expect to face on the job and in life.
This year’s conference will focus on the role of journalism in the cyber sphere with several key focus areas.

AFJ is hosting this year’s  IMED in partnership with PAWA 254 and  Center of International Media Ethics.

We will focus on four key areas;

  1. Social Media,
  2. Citizen Journalism,
  3. Online security
  4. Data protection.

The one day workshop on Friday 19th September, will take a simple format of two 3 – hour Master classes. T

The Master classes will be split in two:

1. Social Media and Citizen Journalism

2. Online security and Data protection

The journalists will choose which 3 hour workshop they would like attend first and later swap classes in the afternoon session.

Social Media and Citizen Journalism

The master class will be a candid walk through on how best they can maximize the use of social media sites, and how best to use citizen journalists as a source for information. And also gauge how best to verify the sources of the information they receive through the experience shared by the facilitators.

Online security and Data protection

This master class is particularly pertinent for investigative journalists or those interested in the area of expertise. This session will constitute discussion on how best to protect social profiles and emails, and hiding top secret documentation online, among other key areas the facilitators would choose to bring out.

Online Certificates will be provided at the end of the workshop

 

RSVP: info@Pawa254.org

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AFJ

How I remember Everything By Oduor Jagero

We met on our first day in college. My father had brought me and his mother had brought him. We were both seated at the reception waiting for our parents to do the paper work.
We were both excited; it showed on his face and I felt it in my blood. Our college dreams were kicking off. Later on, out of class and along the corridors, our love lives would coincidentally kick off too.
‘Hi’ soon became ‘hey!’ And then there was ‘How are your studies doing?’ And then we would meet at the school cafeteria, at the games, outings and, again, along the corridors. I was busy feigning shyness while he was busy fighting the same – waiting, gathering courage, and saving money for a proper date.
He never got enough money for a date, but life gave him courage. “Can we take a walk?” I shrugged a “yeah”. We walked to Uhuru Park on a warm Christmas Eve. We sat under a tree and watched civil servants stride and amble and tiptoe from the government offices in Upper Hill into town. With the only coin he had – an old twenty bob coin with bruised corners – he bought a doughnut and nothing else. I remember he tore it into two, gave me the three-quarter piece and we munched with glee; we chatted and laughed and held hands and we both agreed that it had been a day full of butterflies in our bellies…and l was like “This is awesome!” And he was like, “so freakin’ awesome. Can we do it again?”
And I was like “Hell yeah!”
That day was the beginning of our love story, a strong bond that I have since gotten addicted to. Later, after a few days, we sneaked from college again. We walked the stretch from college, passing right through the heart of Nairobi, and took a corner at Kipande House and crossed into Central Park. It was a rainy season. So we expected the green grass. There it was, a meadow so inviting and so romantic. We lay there and listened to us tell stories; I told him how I used to fear thunder as a kid and he told me how he used to fear darkness. He wanted me to know of his family. I told him of my family too. It was interesting to him that my father was a teacher and my mother was a lay reader. “A reader and a teacher!” he said. We giggled about the loftiness of our dreams and shallowness of our ambitions.
We were always broke. “Let’s break bad”, he always said. But my guy had inexpensive, even brilliant ways of having fun. Often times we walked towards Arboretum; we would stroll up passed Mamlaka Chapel, shy away from Nairobi University hostels and the zigzag, hand in hand, until we saw the Statehouse’s white fence. We feared walking too close to it. Munching on crisps, or njugu or popcorns – those days we ate everything, no wonder we farted a lot too -we would ramble on the other side of the road.
Those days, Arboretum had scores of broke people, which was good because then love was real – even sweet. Lovebirds were everywhere in that beautiful park. They were under trees, on the grass, at the other end of the park, or narrow pathways, or hidden behind the shrubbery. It was naked love. Once in, we would choose the quieter corners of the park where the grass was taller and privacy was guaranteed. I always carried a leso, which we spread on the meadow. We kissed for long hours. But he did not lift my skirt and I did not touch his zipper, which was good because he would later do it in a special way.
I later met his mother, a humble woman married to a good humored husband. She prepared me githeri and chicken and later, after we were full, she prepared ginger tea. She said it was good for a full stomach. “This helps in digestion, my daughter.” She never had a daughter and so, naturally, I was a daughter she never had. Even after I had gone, she still called my name until her son, my sweetheart, reminded her that I had left.
He came home too. My father liked him very much. They often enjoyed sipping tea and nibbling on cashew nuts. My father liked to think of himself as a poet, even though he had never written one. They differed on who was better between Robert Frost and Pablo Neruda. Sometimes they would ask for my vote so that a winner could emerge from their arguments.
He liked writing poetry and prose, and so instead of trying too much to buy me lunch, he wrote me ballads and read me his prose. These stories logged me into his thoughts and thrills, helped me wade past the barrier that encrusted his heart. I remember a poem he once wrote me and read to me at what is now called Wangari Maathai corner at Uhuru Park. I remember the sky was blue and a lone star was winking down at us.
When will the egg break into two so I can see the york?
And when will I see the yellow furs of the little bird walk out of the hard Shell?
Did we finish college? Of course yes. On graduation day, we were all smiles. We had accomplished another milestone. He was becoming an accountant and I was becoming a PR and Marketer. After graduation, his mother organized a party for both of us. I remember all the details; there was fish and meat, ugali and mukimo, there was rice and chapatis. Our parents spoke, congratulating us, blessing us and telling us to “go make great exploits”, to “be the best examples for your siblings”. Later on, the following week, under the February sun, we took a hike to Nairobi Safari Walk. The park was deserted, the few animals were away under the shade, and the game reservists had retreated to their quarters.
We were just alone. “I love you!” he said and before I said anything, he added “very much, babe”. What could I say? That I loved him too? I took him by the hand…
Behind the oak tree I tethered his waist. In turn he became naughty. He lifted my blouse and looked at my breasts and said “can I touch?” I was gasping already so I simply nodded. He capped them in his sweaty palms and I felt a tingling sensation in my head, as if alien worms were crawling under my scalp. He kept looking, studying until I was overwhelmed, until I took both his hands and placed them on my hips, until I drew his frame so that our foreheads touched, until our carcasses began to smoke, until our clothes caught fire, until our feet set fire to the fallen leaves. Now he kissed me. I kissed him. We kissed each other. Then we slept in each other’s arms.
One early morning he received a call from a blue chip company. “It’s a job interview babe. Wish me luck.” I was thrilled. “I wish you luck, my love.” Three months later, I walked into the modern office suites inside the lush Lavington area. “You have the job,” they told me. I Whatsapp-ed him. “Thanks for your prayers, darling,” and he wrote back “congratulations hun :)”
Suddenly we were not broke anymore. Remember we loved food? We were bound to spoil ourselves! We visited Chinese restaurants and ate Satay and winglets. Finally we could taste Japanese Tempura and KFC chicken. He took me to a Mongolian restaurant and I took him for a taste of Ugandan matoke.
We travelled around the country – even out of the country. I remember the plains and the lions and the zebras of the Mara. Oh and the winding alleyways of Lamu and the antics of Malindi. I remember us laughing to the airport on our way to Lake Kivu, to the Bahamas and watching a Shakespearean play at Westend, London. I remember waking up in Los Angeles, beholding her tall, winding skyscrapers.
And so in Paris, it was a Saturday afternoon, we had toured the great city all day, visited the Eiffel Tower, Louvre, the Champs Elsees, and watched a movie. He took my hand and we glided along the glittery streets. We stole glances at each other. At times I grabbed him, threw my hands around his neck and kissed him. Then he would look into my eyes before kissing me. I think at one point we sat by the road, just a feet away from a sign written something I don’t remember.
He never wanted us to go back to the hotel. At some point he was withdrawn, away into his world. I understood why when, suddenly, on a deserted Paris street, he knelt down and said “will you marry me, lover?”
I said no “You’re kidding” then I asked “What’s that?” It was a yellow softball written ‘Champion’. What a beautiful furry, sweet little box! But the gorgeousness was in the wool-white interior; so breathtaking. But the splendor was in the ring cradled in there; a pretty vintage, marquise-shaped, 4-diamond carat, and fourteen smaller stones. It sat in the center of his palm. For a moment, I savored its magnificence, but I also thought of the magnitude of my ‘yes’ or ‘no’ for that matter.
He wanted to marry me? I said “No!” then I said “Yes! Yes! Hell yes!” Where did he get the idea to propose in Paris? I would care later. But I must tell you how it felt when this man slid the precious molten metal over my finger; I felt a rush of emotions; an avalanche of sweetness running from my spine passed my neck and then all the way to my head.
It was only fair to kiss him. Kissing we did. Not a short one. Along one, until my lips caught fire and smoke escaped through his nostrils.
Forty-two nights later, inside All-Saints Cathedral Church, in the company of family, friends, accomplices, and enemies thronging the pew, smiling sheepishly, clapping unevenly, the priest, asked me the important question: “Do you take him, to love, to cherish, and hold?” That kind of time-wastage. What did he think?
The next day, in a remote lodge, in Zanzibar, just a few feet away from the Indian Ocean, we finally settled to enjoy our six years of relationship. It was epic in many ways.
First was the sex. Sex sanctioned by our parents and family and priests and friends and enemies. Sex that starts at midnight and ends at midmorning. And then starts at midday and ends at midnight. An overwhelming orgasm after prodigious coitus. Sex that drove me to a comatose and he had to pour ocean water on me so I could come to back to life.
We had children, two great children. They’re twins. Making love was awesome, but I must say that being pregnant with twins is the other side of the coin. Two butterflies flapping in your tummy is magical, eccentric, but…I remember the pelvic floor exercises I endured in order to protect my bladder and womb. And I remember the girdle pains, the puffy ankles, swollen feet, sporadic headaches, and blurred vision. Finally the labour…oh Lord!
I remember I lay on that bed, draped in blue sheets, and this nurse, a Luhya woman with a large nose and thick lips encouraged me, cheering me, pretending to be sharing my pain. My contractions were so sever I started shaking, then I went cold and I said to the nurse “Am dying nurse!” And I remember the nurse yelling something like this; “it’s been nine freakin’ months, lady! This is gonna take a few freakin’ hours! Push!” and I started pushing. Finally the head was out. “You can do it, girl!”
I like to think of myself as a strong woman, able to handle many things at ago. My husband, on the other hand, was a terrific man. So bringing up our children was sort of fun. We were fun loving people and so taking the kids out over the weekends and kicking ass was something we enjoyed rather than viewed as an obligation. We educated them in the best schools we could afford. The twins graduated sometimes back; one with a Master’s degree in education while the other becoming a journalist. His first novel was a best seller; Things Change it was called, a novel I read three times and would read again. There is an excerpt where his main character asks his wife something like this: “Have I changed that much?” and the wife says “Before I answer that, allow me to ask; why can’t you pose this question to one of your mistresses?”

******
“I think this should be the end of my story, my Lord. If there is something I have said, which is untrue, my husband, the man whom I love very much, is right here. He can speak out. If he chooses to keep quiet and insist on divorcing me, I shall wish him luck. I hope he can start all over again. But before I sit down, allow me time with my husband – at least before the verdict crushes my heart.
My darling, you must be aware of the fact that you’re a wise man – at least the grey hair on your head gives that allusion. You must be feeling what am feeling – that you’re about to make a grave mistake. But should you crush my heart, I hope you really want to do it. For your new love, please propose to her in Barcelona, for example, or Rome, because that would come close to your real self.
Ends.

 

 

About the writer

Oduor Jagero is the 2011 African Playwright winner and acclaimed author of the musical sequel Color of God, Confessions Of a Harlot, Eyes on the Rock, and the winning Musical Makmende Vies for President.

Oduor is trained journalist, documentary script writer, and a poet. He works for his company KoaMedia LTD {www.koamedia.co.ke}, a media consulting firm, magazines, and online publications. He is also a tech enthusiast and Lead at CMS AFRICA, an organization that carries out tech tours around universities while also organizing the tech event, CMS AFRICA SUMMIT every year.

He plans to get married – in the future , have a cat and a dog, and later have a son and a daughter.

His voice and opinion is on social media. @jagerome and facebook.com/jagero.

Shoot him a rocket at jagerome@gmail.com if you need anything.